We do not diagnose disease or recommend a treatment protocol or dietary supplement for the treatment of disease. You should share this information with your physician who can determine what nutrition and disease treatment regimen is best for you.  Ask your physician any questions you have concerning your medical condition.

You can search this site or the web for topics of interest that I may have written (use Dr Simone and topic).

“We provide truthful information without emotion or influence from the medical establishment, pharmaceutical industry, national organizations, special interest groups or government agencies.”  Charles B Simone, M.MS., M.D.

PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPLICATIONS OF COVID-19 INFECTION and/or VACCINE – OUR NEXT HEALTH CRISIS

https://bit.ly/3kkrejY

Close to 80% of patients have prolonged illness after COVID-19 infection – the long haulers.  These complications are generally seen in those who had mild to moderate infections and in young adults who did not need respiratory support.  And some who receive the vaccine have similar complications.  

Spike proteins from Covid-19 Infection and/or spike proteins made from the vaccine can cause inflammation and organ dysfunction when they bind to the ACE2 docking sites on human cells of the Mucus Membranes, Eye, Respiratory Tract, Heart / Blood Vessels, Brain, Musculoskeletal, Gastrointestinal, Kidney, Skin. This binding to organs occurs before antibodies are made to the spike proteins.  The more ACE2 receptors there are in a person, the more spike proteins get attached leaving fewer spike proteins freely available to make antibodies.  That’s why people who take certain medicines and/or have certain risk factors have a blunted immune response to the vaccine but still can have inflammation and organ dysfunction (1,2).

A person may experience any of the following:

Mucus membranes: Running nose, sneezing, burning and itchy eyes. 

Respiratory Tract: shortness of breath, congestion, pneumonia, persistent cough, etc.

Heart / Blood Vessels: chest pain, arrhythmias, blood pressure changes, blood clotting, etc.

Brain (3): ‘Leaky’ Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB), brain fog or difficulty concentrating, loss of smell, malaise, fatigue, headaches or migraines that come on suddenly become worse with standing and get more severe as the day progresses, depression, insomnia, vertigo, panic attacks, tinnitus, etc.  ADD / ADHD / Autism spectrum disorders.  If the BBB is damaged or weakened in some way, immune cells are able to cross and attack the myelin around your nerves, which leads to nerve damage and MS symptoms. 

Musculoskeletal: muscle and joint pain, chronic fatigue that does not improve with rest, weakness, inability to exercise, unable to perform normal activities.

Gastrointestinal: Anorexia, diarrhea, bloating, vomiting, nausea, etc.

Skin: Itching, rashes, hair loss.

DR SIMONE’S PROTOCOL 

We do not diagnose disease or recommend a treatment protocol or dietary supplement for the treatment of disease. You should share this information with your physician who can determine what nutrition and disease treatment regimen is best for you.  Ask your physician any questions you have concerning your medical condition.

IF YOU ARE SHORT OF BREATH, HAVE CHEST PAIN OR HAVE ARRHYTHMIA, CALL YOUR PHYSICIAN and/or 911 IMMEDIATELY

1) IVERMECTIN dosing (4) – binds to the spike protein preventing its attachment to the ACE2 receptors (5,6).  Ivermectin also has anti-inflammatory and anti-viral effects.  This is a prescription medicine. 

0.2 – 0.4 mg/kg once a day with meals for 3 to 5 days [1 kg = 2.2 pounds].  Ivermectin comes in 3 mg tablets.

After 3 to 5 days, change to once or twice weekly depending on the time to symptom recurrence/persistence. Discontinue after 2–4 weeks if all symptoms have resolved and do not recur.

Relative Contraindications:

– Patients on Warfarin require close monitoring and dose adjustment.

– Pregnant or lactating women require a more in-depth risk/benefit assessment.

2) ANTI-INFLAMMATORIES like prednisone, aspirin, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin B6 (has anti-thrombosis properties), colchicine. Do not use ibuprofen (https://bit.ly/2J1YJW6).

PREDNISONE – This is a prescription medicine that may increase appetite, raise blood glucose. 

Days 1-5:  20 mg twice a day with food (second dose no later than 4PM to avoid sleeplessness)

Days 5-10: 20 mg in morning with food

Days 11-15: 10 mg in morning with food

ASPIRIN – 325 mg uncoated aspirin taken with the largest meal each day (has anti-platelet and anti-clotting properties)

OMEGA 3 FATTY ACIDS – 4 grams daily (>60% of the weight of the softgel should be EPA + DHA, where EPA is much greater than DHA)

VITAMIN B6 – in the Protector ONCCOR formula  https://bit.ly/3nuTHo6.

3) ANTIOXIDANTS in moderate to high doses, in the correct doses, correct chemical form, and correct ratio of one to another – Consider Protector ONCCOR https://bit.ly/3nuTHo6.

4) ALKALINE pH – a high alkaline pH is important. The function of the stomach is to digest food and liquid by secreting mainly hydrochloric acid.  So even though you may think that alkaline vegetables and expensive “alkaline water” will help you, they do not because of the powerful stomach hydrochloric acid. Consider SIMONE SUPER ENERGY http://www.simonesuperenergy.com/

5) OTHER NUTRIENTS and FAMOTIDINE (over-the-counter Pepcid

ZINC – 50 mg per day with food

N-ACETYL CYSTEINE600 mg twice a day. 

VITAMIN C2000 to 4000 mg each day with food.

VITAMIN D3 – 5,000 IU per day with food.

QUERCETIN500 mg twice per day 

FAMOTIDINE20 mg per day 

REFERENCES

1. Central obesity, smoking, and hypertension are associated with a blunted antibody response to COVID-19 mRNA vaccine  https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.04.13.21255402v1

2. DRUGS / RISK FACTORS INCREASE RISK FOR SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) INFECTION  https://bit.ly/2J1YJW6

3. Ramirez et al. Neurobiology of Disease. Vol 146. Dec 2020. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096999612030406X?via%3Dihub

4. FLCCC Alliance    https://covid19criticalcare.com/covid-19-protocols/i-recover-protocol/

5. Zaidi AK, Dehgani-Mobaraki P.  The mechanisms of action of Ivermectin against SARS-CoV-2: An evidence-based clinical review article.  The Journal of Antibiotics. 15 June 2021.   https://www.nature.com/articles/s41429-021-00430-5#citeas

6. Lehrer S, Rheinstein PH.  Ivermectin Docks to the SARS-CoV-2 Spike Receptor-binding Domain Attached to ACE2. In Vivo. Sep-Oct 2020; 34(5):3023-3026.     https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32871846/

© 2021 Charles B Simone, M.MS., M.D.